DIY Glitter Phone Case

Prada Your Phone: DIY Decoupage Phone Case Tutorial

DIY Decoupage Phone Case Tutorial
DIY Decoupage Phone Case tutorial by Rain Blanken

DIY Decoupage Phone Case Tutorial

I was recently challenged to create a killer glitter phone case tutorial for About.com. But what is there to a glitter phone case tutorial? Add glitter to glue, then apply to phone case. Let dry. Not exactly the most informative or exciting read. Instead, I added a decoupage element to my case that adds this season’s hottest Prada, Louis Vuitton, and Pierre Hardy patterns to my phone case.. without the designer price tag.

Ingredients:

DIY Decoupage Phone Case Tutorial
Everything you’ll need to refashion your phone case. Just like Anna Wintour intended?
Decoupage Phone Case
Cutting up Vogue for the sake of my own fashion.

The phone case was my blank canvas, so right away, I set out on an inspirational hunt through Vogue. I cycled through what I call The Three Stages of Vogue Readership, and came out the other side with lots of inspiration.

Mixing Glitter Glue
Wasting glitter should be a federal offense.

There are more than a few glitter-glue tutorials online, but I have to disagree with most of them. They are always carting out a big ol’ bowl of glitter that poses nicely for photos, but isn’t very practical. We’re only painting a phone case, here, so I don’t need a lot of glitter-glue. Put a dollap on a tupperware lid next to a nearly-equal pile of glitter.

I even used just a blob of glue, then mixed white glitter into one side of the blob, and my other glitter colors into the other sides of the blob. Stop wasting glitter, internet!

Apply the glitter-glue to the phone case, starting with light colors first.


Working with the lightest colors first will make mistakes much easier to fix.

Here is what the dried first layer will look like:

DIY Glitter Phone Case
Let dry overnight. Here is what the first layer of dried glitter looks like.

Not quite solid coverage, so we’ll hit it with another coat:

DIY Glitter Phone Case
Push the second layer of glitter onto the first, filling in any gaps.

The second coat is more about filling gaps. Use a stiff brush to push the grainy glitter mix in there like you’re filling holes in concrete. I’ve never done that before, but this is how I picture it. Don’t let this layer dry before applying your magazine cut-outs.


Now that my ‘beach’ is in place, I can start adding my magazine cut-outs. I put a bit more glue on the spots where I was going to place my pieces, because the glitter-glue was still bumpy. I also swiped the back of each cut-out with glue. Push these into the wet glitter-glue a bit to sink them in.

Let this dry completely, then come back and add a coat of decoupage glue to the tops of your cut-outs, and about 1/8″ away from them. The goal here is to create a seal around each piece. Let dry, then add a second coat. If you’re particularly rough on your phone cases, come on back for round three. Let dry at least two days before you use your phone case.

DIY Glitter Phone Case
Rain Blanken’s finished decoupage glitter phone case.
Tusken Armor Paint

Female Tusken Raider Bib: Day Four

Tusken Raider Bib
What we are working on today.

I’m back with another costume update for my female Tusken Raider costume. The female Tuskens showed up in Star Wars Episode II. I’m making this costume for MARCon, happening May 9th-11th, 2014.

Last time, I completed the ‘bezel’ oval bits by using a Sculpey mold and Model Magic. Easy peasy. Today, I’m ready to attach the bezels and paint the armor plates on the lower ‘bib’.

Gluing Tusken Raider Bits
Gluing Tusken Raider Bits

I used some E600 to attach the Model Magic bezels to my armor plates. If you didn’t tune in last time, the armor plates are made up of just cardboard and paper mache. Believe it or not, these saltine crackers are going to be awesome female Tusken armor!

E600 was probably not necessary here, but I was foolish enough not to make extra bezels in case of an emergency at the con, so I really want these to stick. Forever.

Painting my saltine armor.
Painting my saltine armor.

I used Dazzling Metallics variety of DecoArt paints in Splendid Gold, Champagne Gold,
Worn Penny, and Rich Espresso. The first layer of paint is a mix of Worn Penny and Splendid Gold.

Female Tusken Armor
Painting pockmarked armor pieces.

As you can see at the top of the above photo, I got a little excited with painting and actually painted a couple of armor crackers before sticking on my bezel. Don’t do that! I should be okay, because it was just a thin layer of paint, but the bezels could come off if you are gluing them on top of paint. I quickly realized the dum-dum nature of this practice and stuck on my bezels before painting.

Tusken Armor Build
Gluing painted pieces to the cloth.

I added two coats of the Worn Penny/Splendid Gold mix. The second layer had decidedly more of the Worn Penny color. I’ve seen female Tusken armor that looked way too gold and didn’t like it, so I want to stay closer to a bronze color, here. When the two layers were dry, I started gluing the armor to a rectangular cloth that measured a few inches taller than all of my pieces. I used just Mod Podge to glue, with a piece of paper underneath the cloth so that it didn’t stick to the finish of my fine imported desk (that means it’s from Ikea).

Building Tusken Armor
Spacing the rectangles tuned out to be easy.

From my reference photos, I gathered that the space between the armor rectangles was exactly as wide as one of the armor pieces. Yay! That made things easy. I just used spare pieces to measure as I went. This is also how I measured and created the long, bottom piece. Haha, Longbottom.

Tusken Raider Paint
Finishing the paint job with more of a bronze color.

I don’t recommend this, but I got antsy to move things along. I should have finished painting all of my armor pieces before putting them on the muslin. But, instead, there I am at about 1 A.M., carefully trying to keep paint off of the muslin. All the best costuming happens after midnight, anyhoo.

Tusken Armor Paint
More painting on my female Tusken armor.

For the details, I added the Rich Espresso color to the pockmarks, and blended the Champagne Gold onto the edges. This gave my armor much more dimension. A mix of the Rich Espresso and Worn Penny will also create the illusion of shallow dents.

Now that I’ve got some paint down, it really feels like this costume is moving along! I’m really happy with the first of my dried and painted paper mache pieces. They totally look like armor and are super lightweight.

Back to Day 2 | Day 5 Coming Soon | Female Tusken Raider Build Index

Tarnished Jewelry Headband

How to Tarnish Jewelry and Metal with Nail Polish

How to Tarnish Jewelry and Metal
The Baroque & Roll styles were too gold for me, so I learned how to tarnish jewelry using nail polish.

When I opened the latest Project DIY box, I was nearly blinded by the plethora of gold within. It was like a treasure trove. Unfortunately, I’m not that into gold jewelry. Find out who was my inspiration for turning all of this gold into looks that were more my style, and learn how you can transform gold pieces into tarnished treasures.

Suggested look from Project DIY:

Baroque n Roll Ring BraceletRain’s look:

Tarnished Metal Jewelry
Rain’s take on the bracelet, with tarnished metal.

I couldn’t wear all of that gold, so I creatd a tarnished look using…

Nail polish!

I’ve admittedly been painting a lot with nail polish lately, but this time, it was all about creating a very specific look. The nail polish colors in purple and brown really helped to dull down the gleaming gold. Check out my other designs compared to the originals:

Make Jewelry Tarnished
Tarnished bracelets by Rain Blanken
Nailpolish Tarnished Jewelry
I added a bit more of a purple color to this one to give it a little edge.

Suggested look from Project DIY:

Project DIY Headband

There were so many cool details on the metal pieces provided that were just lost by the flat gold look. Adding nail polish really helped to make all of those filigree details stand out.

To tarnish your jewelry, first apply nail polish with a small paintbrush. The brush included in the bottle may be too large and clumsy for this kind of work. Use a tissue to wipe the excess polish off of the surface of the metal, leaving polish in all of the nooks and crannies.

Rain’s look:

Tarnished Metal Headband
Rain’s look: with added stones and a tarnished metal.
Tarnished Jewelry Headband
Green stones to match my eyeballs!
How to Tarnish Jewelry and Metal
I have to stop making this face in photos.

Suggested look from Project DIY:

Baroque EarringsRain’s look:

How to Tarnish Metal
Rain’s earrings with nail polish applied as a faux tarnish.

Let your faux tarnish dry completely, then use a toothpick to rub off any spots that you want the gold to shine through.

Read more about the Baroque N’ Roll Project DIY box and how I transformed the bright gold pieces to match my eyes and personal style.